Mood: History

Origin of the Wishbone Tradition

 

The superstitious ritual of breaking a wishbone has been around for centuries with an interesting history rooted in Medieval Europe. As far as historians and archaeologists can tell, in 15th Century Europe the Etruscans, an ancient Italian civilization, believed geese had supernatural visionary powers as oracle birds with these prophetic powers residing within its bones. The Etruscans observed the migratory behavior of geese and believed their reappearance each year signaled the return of the sun, the arrival of spring, and with it, fertility and prosperity.

The day to celebrate the magical and prophetic powers of the goose was November 11, Saint Martin’s day. After feasting on a fattened goose its bones would be dried in the sun, and the next day the breastbone in particular would be examined to predict the severity of the approaching winter. A dark wishbone predicted a severe winter, whereas a lighter color forecast a mild winter.

In 1455 German physician, Dr. Hartleib witnessed and described this practice, and also noted that the Teutonic knights of the time would use a goose’s wishbone to determine the most advantageous time to wage war. Continue Reading →

Fashion, Art and the Baule Tribe

‘Adorned by Buddha & the Baule’ is one of our stunning exclusive one-off necklaces.

This piece features:
Handcrafted clay Buddha amulet pendant from Thailand set in brass. Antique hand-cast trade beads from the Baule Tribe of the Ivory Coast, Africa (see history below). Cowry shell clusters from East Timor, with wooden and brass beading on knotted hemp with an adjustable brass chain.

 

The Baule Tribe:

The Baule also known as Baoule, are one of the largest ethnic groups of the Cote d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast) in Africa. They played a central role in twentieth-century history of their country having waged the longest war of resistance to French colonization of any West African people, whilst also managing to maintain their traditional beliefs and objects for longer than many other ethnic groups. Continue Reading →

Mantiques. Antiques for Men.

We create unique, meaningful and exclusive one-off pieces of wearable art by collecting a vast array of vintage, antique and collectible items from across the globe. Individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio, we breathe new life into these forgotten relics by giving each piece its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within each piece.
‘The Diver and the Deep Blue Sea’
AUD $579 | SOLD
Features:
Vintage nautical iron anchor pendant from Australia.
Solid brass cowy shell pendants.
Old keys from India.
Small skull beads intricately carved by hand from deer antler, using a 300-year-old design passed down through generations of a family of carvers.
Brass beading with knotted kangaroo hide leather detail.
‘Desert Wanderer’
AUD $479
Features:
Old key from India.
Old silver alloy coin pendant dated from 1985 to 1986, from the nomadic Banjara Tribe of Northern India (see history below).
Old snake vertebrae bone beads from the Sub-Saharan region, West Africa (see history below).
Knotted and wrapped kangaroo hide leather detail.

Continue Reading →

A Vintage Christmas

Yep, its that time of year again where I gather all the old books once belonging to my Grandparents and Great Grandparents and create a cool little vintage style tree for our studio… So simple, so easy and such a nice way to bring family together who are gone but never forgotten.

 

 

JFK Assassination

Tomorrow, November 22nd will be the 52nd anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy.  A moment in history which has stamped itself on the hearts and minds of millions around the world.

This rare photograph depicts the moment when Jackie was trying to recover pieces of skull and brain tissue that got splattered over the boot. It was an instant reaction and when she realised what she was doing she quickly backed off and sat back down.

They Once Roamed ‘Wild & Free’

Our buffalo skull neckpiece has been intricately carved by hand from naturally shed deer antler. It was designed to honor and respect the majestic and fearless beast that once roamed plentiful, wild and free on the vast plains of North America.

Considered a life-force for Native American people and a gift from the Great Spirit, this sacred and symbolic animal represents: wisdom, patience, prosperity, gratitude, abundance, strength, stability, consistency and blessing.

The buffalo teaches us to remain well grounded, find strength to carry on our path, to be in harmony with Mother Earth and to connect with the sacredness of life.

 

HISTORICAL IMAGE REFERENCE:
No. 1 - Two hunters inspect their kill circa 1903.
No. 2 - Native American tribesmen, circa 1907.
No. 3 - Men pose with a mountain of buffalo skulls, circa mid-1870s.
No. 4 - Wright's buffalo hide yard, Dodge City, Kansas, circa 1878.
No. 5 - Moose Jaw, circa 1870s, a pile of bison bones waiting to be loaded onto a train for distribution.

GENERAL HISTORY:

Buffalo, also referred to as bison, once ruled the North American plains from Canada down to Mexico and reigned supreme over their territory. They were believed to have been the biggest population of large wild mammals anywhere on Earth numbering a staggering estimated 50 million before European settlers arrived. Awestruck witnesses reported seeing ‘seas of black’, and feeling the ground trembling beneath their feet with the beat of literally millions of pounding hooves.

Where they once roamed wild and free, the landscape of the West dramatically changed when they were tragically hunted to near extinction during the 19th century. By the mid 1880s these majestic beasts were reduced to only few hundred, and it is estimated an astonishing 7.5 million buffalo were killed in a two year period from 1872 to 1874 alone, thus bringing an end to an important era in American history. Continue Reading →

Picnic at Los Angeles Alligator Farm, circa 1920′s.

Promise of the Princess Bride

Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece.

This piece titled The Promise of a Princess Bride, features:

  • Antique triangular ‘telsum’ prayer box protective amulet pendants, from the Oromo Tribe of Ethiopia, circa early 1900s (see history below).
  • Old ghungroo bell beads from the nomadic Banjara Tribe of Northern India (see history below).
  • Old ostrich eggshell disk beads from Kenya (see history below).
  • Cowry shell clusters from East Timor.
  • Knotted hemp and an adjustable brass chain.
  • AUD $389

DIMENSIONS:
Length: 25cm
Width of prayer box: 2cm

PLEASE NOTE:
Length is measured from the clasp at the back of neck to the end of the piece.
The piece is fastened at its longest point for this measurement.
Width is measured at the widest point of the main feature.
Due to the handcrafted nature of this product sizing may vary slightly from the dimensions listed.

 
Ethiopian ‘Telsum’ Prayer Boxes:
Ethiopian prayer boxes are traditionally made from an amalgamation of silver, alloy and/or nickel. Some are elaborately decorated and feature granulated designs created with melted silver. Worn by the Oromo People as protective amulets from various perils and superstitions, these particular amulets date from the early 1900s. Continue Reading →

The Story of Ones Life

We collect a vast array of vintage, antique and collectible items from across the globe and breathe new life into forgotten relics from history creating unique and meaningful exclusive one-off pieces of wearable art.
Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece.

This piece titled The Story of Ones Life, features:

  • Antique Ethiopian leather talisman amulet scroll, traditionally gifted at birth to give protective properties, healing, and blessings (see history below).
  • Skull pendants hand carved from naturally shed deer antler using a 300-year-old design passed down through generations of a family of carvers.
  • Antique hand-cast brass tubular and trade beads from the Baule Tribe of the Ivory Coast, Africa (see history below).
  • Old ostrich eggshell disk beads from Kenya, Africa (see history below).
  • Cowry shell clusters from East Timor.
  • Coconut and brass beading on knotted hemp string on an adjustable brass chain.
  • AUD $679

 

The Baule Tribe:

The Baule also known as Baoulé, are one of the largest ethnic groups of the Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast) in Africa. They played a central role in twentieth-century history of their country having waged the longest war of resistance to French colonization of any West African people, whilst also managing to maintain their traditional beliefs and objects for longer than many other ethnic groups.

According to a legend, during the eighteenth century when Ashanti rose to power, the Baule led by Queen Pokou were forced to leave Ghana as it’s known today. Fleeing for their lives, they travelled west and arrived at the shores of the Comoe, a large river they were unable to cross. The tribe began to throw their most prized possessions into the river. The Queen realized their most valuable possession was her son, and in order to save the tribe she needed to sacrifice him to the river. Continue Reading →

Guess Who?

Images of young icons that made us go ‘wow’!

Queen Bee of the Sea

We collect a vast array of vintage, antique and collectible items from across the globe. We breathe new life into forgotten relics from history creating unique and meaningful exclusive one-off pieces of wearable art.

Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece. This piece titled Queen Bee of the Sea, features:

  • Coral pendant from Australia.
  • Antique hand crafted ornate brass, and hand-cast trade beads from the Baule Tribe of the Ivory Coast, Africa (see history below).
  • Antique hand-cast brass beads from the Igbo Tribe of Nigeria, Africa (see history below).
  • Fish vertebrae trade beads from Gambia, Africa.
  • Antique brass beads handcrafted by the Yoruba Tribe of Nigeria, West Africa (see history below).
  • Shell clusters with brass and wooden beading on knotted hemp with an adjustable brass chain.
  • AUD $429
 
DIMENSIONS:
Length: 32.5cm
Width of coral pendant: 2cm
PLEASE NOTE:
Length is measured from the clasp at the back of neck to the end of the piece.
The piece is fastened at its longest point for this measurement.
Width is measured at the widest point of the main feature.
Due to the handcrafted nature of this product sizing may vary slightly from the dimensions listed.

 

THE HISTORY:
The Baule Tribe:
The Baule also known as Baoulé, are one of the largest ethnic groups of the Côte d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast) in Africa. They played a central role in twentieth-century history of their country having waged the longest war of resistance to French colonizatio

n of any West African people, whilst also managing to maintain their traditional beliefs and objects for longer than many other ethnic groups.

 

According to a legend, during the eighteenth century when Ashanti rose to power, the Baule led by Queen Pokou were forced to leave Ghana as it’s known today. Fleeing for their lives, they travelled west and arrived at the shores of the Comoe, a large river they were unable to cross. The tribe began to throw their most prized possessions into the river. The Queen realized their most valuable possession was her son, and in order to save the tribe she needed to sacrifice him to the river.

Continue Reading →

King of the Jungle

Actress and model Tippi Hedren, also the mother of actress Melanie Griffith was best known for her role in Hitchcock’s film The Birds.

In 1969, Tippi was filming a movie in Africa and visited an abandoned house in Mozambique occupied by 30 lions and their cubs. Her time spent there changed her life forever and prompted both her and her husband to make a movie about what they had seen.

Production of the 1981 epic film Roar which was considered to be one of the most dangerous films ever made. Little did Tippi and her husband know, but this film starring dozens of African lions would be an 11-year investment that would later cost them their marriage. For a project that cost over $17.5 million, the film only grossed just over $2million in the end.

Soon after production of the film wrapped in 1983, she founded the Shambala Preserve, a fully functioning animal sanctuary to protect exotic animals who suffered from gross mistreatment and neglect.

Hedren still looks back with nostalgia however to the days when she had wild animals in her home:

“I miss nursing the cubs very much,” she said. “I really treasure that experience. There’s nothing sweeter than a little baby lion or tiger cub. They’re magical.”

 

The Wild Wild West

Embossed Leather Gunpowder Flask, circa 1865

We present to you this stunning authentic antique leather gunpowder flask from the American Civil War era, circa 1865. The leather body of this piece is embossed with a truly beautiful hunting scene depicting a gentleman wearing a top hat, carrying a gun with his hunting dog by his side in the woods.

This mid 19th Century flattened pear shaped design is referred to as the ‘powder pear’ or, ‘poire-poudre’. It has a quick loading gunpowder measuring and dispensing mechanism in excellent working order, and the spout is made of brass. At the bottom of the pear shaped flask is a small ring which was once used to thread with cord and sling around the neck for quick access. Gunpowder flasks with these rings were eventually phased out after the 19th Century when Europeans incorporated large pockets into the design of hunting clothes.
(See history below for further information).

A powder flask is a small container for gunpowder, which was an essential part of shooting equipment with muzzle-loading guns before pre-made bullets or cartridges became standard in the late 19th Century. The styles and designs for gunpowder flasks differed greatly with the very elaborately decorated works of art generally used for sport-shooting and hunting. Continue Reading →

For the Love of Lace

Republic of You collects a vast array of vintage, antique and collectible items from across the globe. We breathe new life into forgotten relics from history creating unique and meaningful exclusive one-off pieces of wearable art.
Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece.

This piece titled For the Love of Lace, features:

  • Antique lace collar from the early 1900s.
  • Antique etched fob watch from London (not in working order).
  • WWII General Service tunic buttons from the United Kingdom.
  • Brass chain and miniature glass beads.
  • Antique silver alloy pendants from the Newari People of Kathmandu Valley, Nepal (see history below).
  • Antique hand-cast brass bead from the Igbo Tribe of Nigeria, Africa (see history below).
  • POA

DIMENSIONS:

Length: 35cm
Width: 32cm
Width of fob watch: 5cm
Width of buttons: 2cm
PLEASE NOTE:
Length is measured from the clasp at the back of neck to the end of the piece.
Width is measured at the widest point of the main feature.
Due to the handcrafted nature of this product sizing may vary slightly from the dimensions listed.

 

The Igbo Tribe:

The Igbo people, formerly known as ‘Ibo’ are one of the largest and most influential ethnic groups in Nigeria. They live mainly in the forested areas of southwest Nigeria, on both sides of the Niger River, and the Igbo number some ten million individuals. They are subdivided into thirty-three subgroups and are spread out among about two hundred villages scattered through thick forest and semi-fertile marshland.

The heads of families form the council of elders which shares its power with numerous secret societies. These societies exercise great political and social influence. They are hierarchical, with their members passing from one level to the next. There is strong social pressure toward individual distinction and men can move upward through successive grades by demonstrating their achievements and their generosity. Continue Reading →

Alchemy of Art

al·che·my [al-kuh-mee] Magical power or process of transmuting a common substance, usually of little value, into a substance of great value.

Republic of You collects a vast array of vintage, antique and collectible items from across the globe. We breathe new life into forgotten relics from history creating unique and meaningful exclusive one-off pieces of wearable art.

We encourage individuality whilst at the same time celebrating history, art, fashion and creativity. Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece.

This piece titled The Alchemy of Art, features:

  • Old handmade silver alloy Kuchi rattle pendant and tribal ghungroo bell beads from the nomadic Banjara Tribe of Northern India (see history).
  • Vintage blue glass beads from Nepal.
  • Old metal skull mala beads from Tibet.
  • Cowry shell clusters from East Timor.
  • Old ostrich eggshell disk beads from Kenya (see history).
  • Knotted hemp with an adjustable brass chain.
  • AUD $389
DIMENSIONS:
Length: 38cm
Width of rattle pendant: 3cm
PLEASE NOTE:
Length is measured from the clasp at the back of neck to the end of the piece.
The piece is fastened at its longest point for this measurement.
Width is measured at the widest point of the main feature.
Due to the handcrafted nature of this product sizing may vary slightly from the dimensions listed.

 

The Banjara Tribe:

The Banjara People are a collective of nomadic gypsy tribes from Northern India. They are said to be the descendants of the Roma gypsies of Europe who migrated to India through the rugged mountains of Afghanistan and finally settled in Rajasthan.

Originally the Banjaras were bullock transport carriers and builders of great monuments. For centuries they efficiently moved their enormous caravans through the vast roadless tracks of India guaranteeing safe conduct for grain, salt and messages. Due to the nomadic nature of their culture, they traditionally ‘wore’ their wealth creating a unique aesthetic, colorful dress and spectacular jewelry quite unlike any other tribe. Continue Reading →

An Unbelievable Story of Survival…

In 1911 at age 23, Violet Constance Jessop was working as a steward on the RMS Olympic. It collided with the HMS Hawke. She survived.

In 1912, Violet again worked as a stewardess, this time on the RMS Titanic. It infamously collided with an iceberg, the ship sank, and she survived.

In 1916, during the First World War Violet Jessop was working for the British Red Cross onboard the HMHS Britannic. There was an explosion. The ship sank. She survived. Continue Reading →

Simplicity is the Key

I was inspired to create something beautiful using my late grandmother’s collection of antique sheet music. My grandmother’s passion was playing and teaching music… she played the piano and cello, and although I have no memory of her doing this, it was important for to me to create something which honoured one of her great loves in life.

Not long after my mother was born, her marriage to my grandfather broke down. They decided to end their marriage, something which was quite rare in her day.

Such a decision meant she had no choice but to go back and live with her parents. In order to support her only child, my mother, she made the decision to give up her love for music and work as a secretary at the local school in Brisbane where she remained for the entirety of her working life.

So this simple little wallet has a story and a significance much greater than what meets the eye. The lining of each purse has come from my wonderful grandmother’s collection of her much loved sheet music.

Continue Reading →

Humble Beginnings

Republic of You collects a vast array of vintage, antique and collectible items from across the globe. We breathe new life into forgotten relics from history creating unique and meaningful exclusive one-off pieces of wearable art.

We encourage individuality whilst at the same time celebrating history, art, fashion and creativity. Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece.

This piece titled Humble Beginnings, features:

  • Old brass cylinder box from Tibet, with fabric mantras enclosed.
  • Antique mala yak bone prayer beads with copper and metal inlays from Tibet (see history).
  • Handmade ‘lost wax’ beads, from the Ashanti People of the Ivory Coast, West Africa (see history).
  • Antique hand-cast brass tubular trade beads from the Baule Tribe of Africa (see history).
  • Bone disc beads from Nepal.
  • Cowry shell clusters from East Timor.
  • Brass beading, knotted cotton and an adjustable brass chain.
  • AUD $449

 

The Baule Tribe:

The Baule also known as Baoulé, are one of the largest ethnic groups of the Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast) in Africa. They played a central role in twentieth-century history of their country having waged the longest war of resistance to French colonization of any West African people, whilst also managing to maintain their traditional beliefs and objects for longer than many other ethnic groups.

Continue Reading →

Take Me to the Sea

This piece titled Take Me to the Sea, features:

  • Old silver alloy tribal coin pendant, and ghungroo bell beads from the nomadic Banjara Tribe of Northern India
  • Cowry shell clusters from East Timor.
  • Old ostrich eggshell disk beads from Kenya.
  • Knotted and an adjustable brass chain.
  • AUD $389
We encourage individuality whilst at the same time celebrating history, art, fashion and creativity.  Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece. Continue Reading →

The Secrets of Savannah

Republic of You collects a vast array of vintage, antique and collectible items from across the globe. We breathe new life into forgotten relics from history creating unique and meaningful exclusive one-off pieces of wearable art.  We encourage individuality whilst at the same time celebrating history, art, fashion and creativity.

Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece.

This piece titled The Secrets of Savannah, features:

  • Authentic buffalo teeth from the United States.
  • Old Indian silver alloy coin pendants from Nepal dated from 1970 to 1973.
  • Antique hand crafted ornate brass and trade beads from the Baule Tribe of the Ivory Coast, Africa (see history below).
  • Brass beading and chain detail on knotted hemp with an adjustable brass chain.

The Baule Tribe, also known as Baoulé, are one of the largest ethnic groups of the Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast) in Africa. They played a central role in twentieth-century history of their country having waged the longest war of resistance to French colonization of any West African people, whilst also managing to maintain their traditional beliefs and objects for longer than many other ethnic groups.

According to a legend, during the eighteenth century when Ashanti rose to power, the Baule led by Queen Pokou were forced to leave Ghana as it’s known today. Fleeing for their lives, they travelled west and arrived at the shores of the Comoe, a large river they were unable to cross. The tribe began to throw their most prized possessions into the river. The Queen realized their most valuable possession was her son, and in order to save the tribe she needed to sacrifice him to the river.

Continue Reading →

Operation Crossroads

Operation Crossroads | A series of nuclear weapon tests conducted by the United States in July 1946.

Yoruba People and Scarification

With a population close to 40 million, the Yoruba People are one of the largest tribal ethnic groups of West Africa, found predominantly in Nigeria. One distinguishing feature of the Yoruba are their tribal markings, also known as tribal beautification or scarification marks. This practice is considered an ancient art and cultural activity for the Yoruba.

Due to the sheer number of individuals within the Yoruba, these tribal markings became a way and means of identifying the origin of an individual, their lineage, and which community or sub-tribe they belonged to within the Kingdom of the Yoruba.

Tribal marks were also originally made on young children in an attempt to protect them from slave trading. It was the absence of these markings, which made them vulnerable to being captured. For those tribe members who were sold into slavery, these markings allowed the Yoruba people to identify and recognize one another.

Sacred text describes the history of tribal marks. It is believed King Sango, who reigned during the Oyo Empire, sent two slaves to a distant country on an important mission. In due course they returned and the King found that one slave had successfully achieved what he had been sent to do, while the other had accomplished nothing. The king therefore rewarded the first with high honors and commanded the second to receive a hundred and twenty two cuts all over his body. This was considered a severe punishment, although when the scars healed they gave the slave a rather remarkable aesthetic appearance which took the fancy of the King’s wives.

Sango decided that in the future, cuts should not be given as punishment but rather as a sign of royalty, at once placing himself in the hands of the markers. However, the king could only stand the first two cuts, so from that day onwards two cuts on the arm have been the sign of royalty. Various other markings came to identify different tribes.

The First All-Female Jury, 1911

First All-Woman Jury, Los Angeles 1911

More than a century ago, these 12 ladies sat in a courtroom in Los Angeles and decided the fate of newspaper editor A.A. King. The charge was obscenity. In his paper, The Watts News, King had quoted an insult hurled at him by a city councilman.

At the time of the trial, American women were still eight years away from being able to vote in national elections. But the state of California granted suffrage in a special election on October 10, 1911, just 23 days before the trial began.

Fortunately for King, after 20 minutes of deliberation, these newly empowered women found him not guilty. the youngest juror, 22-year-old Nellie Moomau, told the Tacoma paper, “Our verdict did not mean we approved of such language, but it isn’t half so shocking to read it in the privacy of our homes as it is to hear it on the streets.”

History of the Kitabe

We collect these incredible leather amulet scrolls also known as Kitabe’s, from Ethiopia and incorporate them into our one-off neckpieces.

Each Kitabe is individual, and worn for a man’s lifetime. Written for one particular person, the text is in Ethiopic (Ge’ez), a Semitic language that is no longer spoken, but is still used for liturgical and other religious purposes by the Ethiopian Orthodox Church.

The scrolls inside are occasionally paper, but are most often vellum, usually calfskin, prepared by a lengthy exposure in lime, scraped with a rounded knife and finally rubbed smooth with pumice stone. The vellum is often scored with a pin, and then written in black ink with titles and holy names often scribed in red. Although the subjects of these ‘bibles’ are always Christian, the actual content varies.

It is difficult to date these pieces, which were made as early as the fourteenth century and continued through until about 1850.

Bondi Bay, Australia - circa 1900

Annie Leibovitz on Mick Jagger and the Stones

Looking astonishingly like something out of Jesus Christ Superstar, This image of Mick Jagger was photographed by Annie Leibovitz in New York City, 1980.

Annie Leibovitz on Mick Jagger via Vanity Fair:

When I first worked for Rolling Stone, in the early 70s, we wouldn’t photograph a band until they came to town. I hardly ever traveled. I took some pictures of the Rolling Stones when they came through San Francisco in 1971 and 1972. Truman Capote was supposed to write a story for the magazine about the 1972 tour, and the editor, Jann Wenner, said it was O.K. if I went along to two or three cities. Robert Frank was traveling with the band, making a 16-mm. film that would become Cocksucker Blues. The band had commissioned him to do it, but it was never formally released, presumably because of the drugs and sex that were filmed. Danny Seymour, Frank’s friend and camera assistant, was involved in a lot of that. He died mysteriously while the film was being edited. Continue Reading →

Chelsea Baby Club 1937

(1937) A baby suspended in a wire cage attached to the outside of a high-rise apartment block window. These cages were distributed to members of the Chelsea Baby Club in London who had no gardens.
Lest We Forget... Indigenous Australians at War.

Wonderland Inspiration

Alice Liddell (1852–1934) inspired the children’s classic Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. 

“On 4 July 1862, in a rowing boat travelling on the Isis in Oxford for a picnic, 10-year-old Alice asked Charles Dodgson (pen name Lewis Carroll) to entertain her and her sisters, Edith (age 8) and Lorina (age 13), with a story.

As the Reverend Robinson Duckworth rowed the boat, Dodgson regaled the girls with stories, not unlike those Dodgson had spun for the sisters before, but this time Liddell asked Mr. Dodgson to write it down for her. He eventually presented her with the manuscript of Alice’s Adventures Under Ground in November 1864.”

Wikipedia