Mood:

Martinique Island Style

Our new online stockist Martinique Island Style has been busy buying up in the Republic of You department… here is a little sneak peek at their range of exclusive one off pieces of wearable art.

Double Exposed

There is something of a whimsical and ethereal component to double exposed imagery, a dreamy quality which almost demands you stop and take a closer look.

With two images rolled into one, I can’t help feeling the force of those two images combined, making a greater impact telling two stories in one, and thus creatively having a stronger influence on the viewer.

Here are some of my current favourites… which ones make you stop and look, and ultimately think and feel more deeply?

Promise of the Princess Bride

Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece.

This piece titled The Promise of a Princess Bride, features:

  • Antique triangular ‘telsum’ prayer box protective amulet pendants, from the Oromo Tribe of Ethiopia, circa early 1900s (see history below).
  • Old ghungroo bell beads from the nomadic Banjara Tribe of Northern India (see history below).
  • Old ostrich eggshell disk beads from Kenya (see history below).
  • Cowry shell clusters from East Timor.
  • Knotted hemp and an adjustable brass chain.
  • AUD $389

DIMENSIONS:
Length: 25cm
Width of prayer box: 2cm

PLEASE NOTE:
Length is measured from the clasp at the back of neck to the end of the piece.
The piece is fastened at its longest point for this measurement.
Width is measured at the widest point of the main feature.
Due to the handcrafted nature of this product sizing may vary slightly from the dimensions listed.

 
Ethiopian ‘Telsum’ Prayer Boxes:
Ethiopian prayer boxes are traditionally made from an amalgamation of silver, alloy and/or nickel. Some are elaborately decorated and feature granulated designs created with melted silver. Worn by the Oromo People as protective amulets from various perils and superstitions, these particular amulets date from the early 1900s. Continue Reading →

Nurturing Creativity

Creativity takes shape in so many forms, its facets seem endless from painting to photography, cooking to jewellery design, floristry to music, hairdressing to writing, and architecture to landscaping. Creativity is something, which enriches the soul and brings purpose and meaning to our lives. Continue Reading →

The best dieting advice we have come across all year!

The Story of Ones Life

We collect a vast array of vintage, antique and collectible items from across the globe and breathe new life into forgotten relics from history creating unique and meaningful exclusive one-off pieces of wearable art.
Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece.

This piece titled The Story of Ones Life, features:

  • Antique Ethiopian leather talisman amulet scroll, traditionally gifted at birth to give protective properties, healing, and blessings (see history below).
  • Skull pendants hand carved from naturally shed deer antler using a 300-year-old design passed down through generations of a family of carvers.
  • Antique hand-cast brass tubular and trade beads from the Baule Tribe of the Ivory Coast, Africa (see history below).
  • Old ostrich eggshell disk beads from Kenya, Africa (see history below).
  • Cowry shell clusters from East Timor.
  • Coconut and brass beading on knotted hemp string on an adjustable brass chain.
  • AUD $679

 

The Baule Tribe:

The Baule also known as Baoulé, are one of the largest ethnic groups of the Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast) in Africa. They played a central role in twentieth-century history of their country having waged the longest war of resistance to French colonization of any West African people, whilst also managing to maintain their traditional beliefs and objects for longer than many other ethnic groups.

According to a legend, during the eighteenth century when Ashanti rose to power, the Baule led by Queen Pokou were forced to leave Ghana as it’s known today. Fleeing for their lives, they travelled west and arrived at the shores of the Comoe, a large river they were unable to cross. The tribe began to throw their most prized possessions into the river. The Queen realized their most valuable possession was her son, and in order to save the tribe she needed to sacrifice him to the river. Continue Reading →

Guess Who?

Images of young icons that made us go ‘wow’!

Queen Bee of the Sea

We collect a vast array of vintage, antique and collectible items from across the globe. We breathe new life into forgotten relics from history creating unique and meaningful exclusive one-off pieces of wearable art.

Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece. This piece titled Queen Bee of the Sea, features:

  • Coral pendant from Australia.
  • Antique hand crafted ornate brass, and hand-cast trade beads from the Baule Tribe of the Ivory Coast, Africa (see history below).
  • Antique hand-cast brass beads from the Igbo Tribe of Nigeria, Africa (see history below).
  • Fish vertebrae trade beads from Gambia, Africa.
  • Antique brass beads handcrafted by the Yoruba Tribe of Nigeria, West Africa (see history below).
  • Shell clusters with brass and wooden beading on knotted hemp with an adjustable brass chain.
  • AUD $429
 
DIMENSIONS:
Length: 32.5cm
Width of coral pendant: 2cm
PLEASE NOTE:
Length is measured from the clasp at the back of neck to the end of the piece.
The piece is fastened at its longest point for this measurement.
Width is measured at the widest point of the main feature.
Due to the handcrafted nature of this product sizing may vary slightly from the dimensions listed.

 

THE HISTORY:
The Baule Tribe:
The Baule also known as Baoulé, are one of the largest ethnic groups of the Côte d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast) in Africa. They played a central role in twentieth-century history of their country having waged the longest war of resistance to French colonizatio

n of any West African people, whilst also managing to maintain their traditional beliefs and objects for longer than many other ethnic groups.

 

According to a legend, during the eighteenth century when Ashanti rose to power, the Baule led by Queen Pokou were forced to leave Ghana as it’s known today. Fleeing for their lives, they travelled west and arrived at the shores of the Comoe, a large river they were unable to cross. The tribe began to throw their most prized possessions into the river. The Queen realized their most valuable possession was her son, and in order to save the tribe she needed to sacrifice him to the river.

Continue Reading →

King of the Jungle

Actress and model Tippi Hedren, also the mother of actress Melanie Griffith was best known for her role in Hitchcock’s film The Birds.

In 1969, Tippi was filming a movie in Africa and visited an abandoned house in Mozambique occupied by 30 lions and their cubs. Her time spent there changed her life forever and prompted both her and her husband to make a movie about what they had seen.

Production of the 1981 epic film Roar which was considered to be one of the most dangerous films ever made. Little did Tippi and her husband know, but this film starring dozens of African lions would be an 11-year investment that would later cost them their marriage. For a project that cost over $17.5 million, the film only grossed just over $2million in the end.

Soon after production of the film wrapped in 1983, she founded the Shambala Preserve, a fully functioning animal sanctuary to protect exotic animals who suffered from gross mistreatment and neglect.

Hedren still looks back with nostalgia however to the days when she had wild animals in her home:

“I miss nursing the cubs very much,” she said. “I really treasure that experience. There’s nothing sweeter than a little baby lion or tiger cub. They’re magical.”

 

The Wild Wild West

Embossed Leather Gunpowder Flask, circa 1865

We present to you this stunning authentic antique leather gunpowder flask from the American Civil War era, circa 1865. The leather body of this piece is embossed with a truly beautiful hunting scene depicting a gentleman wearing a top hat, carrying a gun with his hunting dog by his side in the woods.

This mid 19th Century flattened pear shaped design is referred to as the ‘powder pear’ or, ‘poire-poudre’. It has a quick loading gunpowder measuring and dispensing mechanism in excellent working order, and the spout is made of brass. At the bottom of the pear shaped flask is a small ring which was once used to thread with cord and sling around the neck for quick access. Gunpowder flasks with these rings were eventually phased out after the 19th Century when Europeans incorporated large pockets into the design of hunting clothes.
(See history below for further information).

A powder flask is a small container for gunpowder, which was an essential part of shooting equipment with muzzle-loading guns before pre-made bullets or cartridges became standard in the late 19th Century. The styles and designs for gunpowder flasks differed greatly with the very elaborately decorated works of art generally used for sport-shooting and hunting. Continue Reading →