Mood:

For the Love of Lace

Republic of You collects a vast array of vintage, antique and collectible items from across the globe. We breathe new life into forgotten relics from history creating unique and meaningful exclusive one-off pieces of wearable art.
Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece.

This piece titled For the Love of Lace, features:

  • Antique lace collar from the early 1900s.
  • Antique etched fob watch from London (not in working order).
  • WWII General Service tunic buttons from the United Kingdom.
  • Brass chain and miniature glass beads.
  • Antique silver alloy pendants from the Newari People of Kathmandu Valley, Nepal (see history below).
  • Antique hand-cast brass bead from the Igbo Tribe of Nigeria, Africa (see history below).
  • POA

DIMENSIONS:

Length: 35cm
Width: 32cm
Width of fob watch: 5cm
Width of buttons: 2cm
PLEASE NOTE:
Length is measured from the clasp at the back of neck to the end of the piece.
Width is measured at the widest point of the main feature.
Due to the handcrafted nature of this product sizing may vary slightly from the dimensions listed.

 

The Igbo Tribe:

The Igbo people, formerly known as ‘Ibo’ are one of the largest and most influential ethnic groups in Nigeria. They live mainly in the forested areas of southwest Nigeria, on both sides of the Niger River, and the Igbo number some ten million individuals. They are subdivided into thirty-three subgroups and are spread out among about two hundred villages scattered through thick forest and semi-fertile marshland.

The heads of families form the council of elders which shares its power with numerous secret societies. These societies exercise great political and social influence. They are hierarchical, with their members passing from one level to the next. There is strong social pressure toward individual distinction and men can move upward through successive grades by demonstrating their achievements and their generosity. Continue Reading →

Leatherwear

Key Notes & Essentials:

We like to think simplicity is one of the keys to sophistication, so we have designed this simple yet functional and uber stylish document wallet or computer sleeve to suit both men and women. Seamlessly handcrafted, with durable cowhide leather on both the inside and out, each wallet features a genuine vintage cloakroom tag from 1950s London, and an interior pocket lined with authentic antique sheet music (see history below).

 

I was inspired to create something beautiful using my late grandmother’s collection of antique sheet music. My grandmother’s passion was playing and teaching music… she played the piano and cello, and although I have no memory of her doing this, it was important for to me to create something which honoured one of her great loves in life. Continue Reading →

Recipe for health and happiness...

Alchemy of Art

al·che·my [al-kuh-mee] Magical power or process of transmuting a common substance, usually of little value, into a substance of great value.

Republic of You collects a vast array of vintage, antique and collectible items from across the globe. We breathe new life into forgotten relics from history creating unique and meaningful exclusive one-off pieces of wearable art.

We encourage individuality whilst at the same time celebrating history, art, fashion and creativity. Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece.

This piece titled The Alchemy of Art, features:

  • Old handmade silver alloy Kuchi rattle pendant and tribal ghungroo bell beads from the nomadic Banjara Tribe of Northern India (see history).
  • Vintage blue glass beads from Nepal.
  • Old metal skull mala beads from Tibet.
  • Cowry shell clusters from East Timor.
  • Old ostrich eggshell disk beads from Kenya (see history).
  • Knotted hemp with an adjustable brass chain.
  • AUD $389
DIMENSIONS:
Length: 38cm
Width of rattle pendant: 3cm
PLEASE NOTE:
Length is measured from the clasp at the back of neck to the end of the piece.
The piece is fastened at its longest point for this measurement.
Width is measured at the widest point of the main feature.
Due to the handcrafted nature of this product sizing may vary slightly from the dimensions listed.

 

The Banjara Tribe:

The Banjara People are a collective of nomadic gypsy tribes from Northern India. They are said to be the descendants of the Roma gypsies of Europe who migrated to India through the rugged mountains of Afghanistan and finally settled in Rajasthan.

Originally the Banjaras were bullock transport carriers and builders of great monuments. For centuries they efficiently moved their enormous caravans through the vast roadless tracks of India guaranteeing safe conduct for grain, salt and messages. Due to the nomadic nature of their culture, they traditionally ‘wore’ their wealth creating a unique aesthetic, colorful dress and spectacular jewelry quite unlike any other tribe. Continue Reading →

Wild Woman of the West

Each piece we create is individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio and given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece.

This piece titled ‘Wild Woman of the West’ features:

  • Buffalo skull pendant hand carved from naturally shed deer antler.
  • Skull pendants hand carved from buffalo horn using a 300-year-old design passed down through generations of a family of carvers.
  • Antique hand-cast brass braided beads from Tibet.
  • Cowry shell clusters from East Timor.
  • Brass beading and brass chain detail on knotted kangaroo hide leather on an adjustable brass chain.
  • AUD $509
DIMENSIONS:
Length: 40cm
Width of buffalo pendant: 5cm Continue Reading →

She Sold Her Soul to Rock n Roll

We collect a vast array of vintage, antique and collectible items from across the globe. We breathe new life into forgotten relics from history creating unique and meaningful exclusive one-off pieces of wearable art.

This piece titled ‘She Sold Her Soul to Rock n Roll’, features:

  • Antique pectoral crucifix with wooden inlay, circa 1930s.
  • Old Indian silver alloy coin pendants from Nepal, undated.
  • Skull beads intricately hand carved from buffalo horn, using a 300-year-old design passed down through generations of a family of carvers.
  • Old cylinder beads from the nomadic Banjara Tribe of Northern India (see history below).
  • Antique barrel key from India.
  • Knotted kangaroo hide leather.
  • AUD $549
 

DIMENSIONS:
Length: 56cm
Width of crucifix: 5cm

PLEASE NOTE:
Length is measured from the back of neck to the end of the piece.
Width is measured at the widest point of the main feature.
Due to the handcrafted nature of this product sizing may vary slightly from the dimensions listed.

 

The Banjara Tribe:
The Banjara People are a collective of nomadic gypsy tribes from Northern India. They are said to be the descendants of the Roma gypsies of Europe who migrated to India through the rugged mountains of Afghanistan and finally settled in Rajasthan.
Originally the Banjaras were bullock transport carriers and builders of great monuments. For centuries they efficiently moved their enormous caravans through the vast roadless tracks of India guaranteeing safe conduct for grain, salt and messages.
Due to the nomadic nature of their culture, they traditionally ‘wore’ their wealth creating a unique aesthetic, colorful dress and spectacular jewelry quite unlike any other tribe. Continue Reading →
fear·less [feer-lis] - adj: 

Fearless is not the absence of fear. It’s not being completely unafraid. Fearless is having fears, having doubts. Lots of them. Fearless is living in spite of those things that scare you to death. Fearless is falling madly in love again, even though you’ve been hurt before. Fearless is getting back up and fighting for what you want over and over again… even though every time you’ve tried before, you’ve lost. It’s fearless to have faith that someday things will change.

An Unbelievable Story of Survival…

In 1911 at age 23, Violet Constance Jessop was working as a steward on the RMS Olympic. It collided with the HMS Hawke. She survived.

In 1912, Violet again worked as a stewardess, this time on the RMS Titanic. It infamously collided with an iceberg, the ship sank, and she survived.

In 1916, during the First World War Violet Jessop was working for the British Red Cross onboard the HMHS Britannic. There was an explosion. The ship sank. She survived. Continue Reading →

Simplicity is the Key

I was inspired to create something beautiful using my late grandmother’s collection of antique sheet music. My grandmother’s passion was playing and teaching music… she played the piano and cello, and although I have no memory of her doing this, it was important for to me to create something which honoured one of her great loves in life.

Not long after my mother was born, her marriage to my grandfather broke down. They decided to end their marriage, something which was quite rare in her day.

Such a decision meant she had no choice but to go back and live with her parents. In order to support her only child, my mother, she made the decision to give up her love for music and work as a secretary at the local school in Brisbane where she remained for the entirety of her working life.

So this simple little wallet has a story and a significance much greater than what meets the eye. The lining of each purse has come from my wonderful grandmother’s collection of her much loved sheet music.

Continue Reading →

"If at first you don't succeed, try, try and try again." - William Edward Hickson

Humble Beginnings

Republic of You collects a vast array of vintage, antique and collectible items from across the globe. We breathe new life into forgotten relics from history creating unique and meaningful exclusive one-off pieces of wearable art.

We encourage individuality whilst at the same time celebrating history, art, fashion and creativity. Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece.

This piece titled Humble Beginnings, features:

  • Old brass cylinder box from Tibet, with fabric mantras enclosed.
  • Antique mala yak bone prayer beads with copper and metal inlays from Tibet (see history).
  • Handmade ‘lost wax’ beads, from the Ashanti People of the Ivory Coast, West Africa (see history).
  • Antique hand-cast brass tubular trade beads from the Baule Tribe of Africa (see history).
  • Bone disc beads from Nepal.
  • Cowry shell clusters from East Timor.
  • Brass beading, knotted cotton and an adjustable brass chain.
  • AUD $449

 

The Baule Tribe:

The Baule also known as Baoulé, are one of the largest ethnic groups of the Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast) in Africa. They played a central role in twentieth-century history of their country having waged the longest war of resistance to French colonization of any West African people, whilst also managing to maintain their traditional beliefs and objects for longer than many other ethnic groups.

Continue Reading →

If only it were that simple. 

‘The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.’ – St. Augustine

Seek and You Shall Find

This exclusive one-off piece titled ‘Seek and You Shall Find’, features:

  • Antique glass Apothecary medicine bottle with small map of Paris enclosed, circa 1920s.
  • Pastel blue religious icon, and vintage enamel pectoral crucifix from Rome.
  • Antique hand-cast ‘bug’ beads from the Igbo Tribe of Africa (see history below).
  • Cowry shell clusters from East Timor.
  • Brass and miniature glass beading with knotted hemp detail on an adjustable brass chain.
  • AUD $439

Continue Reading →

Sometimes all you can do is love them back to life.
The art of giving and receiving love… It’s simple really!

Take Me to the Sea

This piece titled Take Me to the Sea, features:

  • Old silver alloy tribal coin pendant, and ghungroo bell beads from the nomadic Banjara Tribe of Northern India
  • Cowry shell clusters from East Timor.
  • Old ostrich eggshell disk beads from Kenya.
  • Knotted and an adjustable brass chain.
  • AUD $389
We encourage individuality whilst at the same time celebrating history, art, fashion and creativity.  Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece. Continue Reading →

A Lesson in Smashing Plates

 

Grab a plate and throw it on the ground.

-  Okay, done.

 Did it break?

 -       Yes.

 Now say sorry to it.

 -       Sorry.

 Did it go back to the way it was before?

 -       No.

 Do you understand?

 

 

The Secrets of Savannah

Republic of You collects a vast array of vintage, antique and collectible items from across the globe. We breathe new life into forgotten relics from history creating unique and meaningful exclusive one-off pieces of wearable art.  We encourage individuality whilst at the same time celebrating history, art, fashion and creativity.

Each piece individually handcrafted in our Byron Bay studio is given its own unique title and an accompanying story listing the features incorporated within the piece.

This piece titled The Secrets of Savannah, features:

  • Authentic buffalo teeth from the United States.
  • Old Indian silver alloy coin pendants from Nepal dated from 1970 to 1973.
  • Antique hand crafted ornate brass and trade beads from the Baule Tribe of the Ivory Coast, Africa (see history below).
  • Brass beading and chain detail on knotted hemp with an adjustable brass chain.

The Baule Tribe, also known as Baoulé, are one of the largest ethnic groups of the Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast) in Africa. They played a central role in twentieth-century history of their country having waged the longest war of resistance to French colonization of any West African people, whilst also managing to maintain their traditional beliefs and objects for longer than many other ethnic groups.

According to a legend, during the eighteenth century when Ashanti rose to power, the Baule led by Queen Pokou were forced to leave Ghana as it’s known today. Fleeing for their lives, they travelled west and arrived at the shores of the Comoe, a large river they were unable to cross. The tribe began to throw their most prized possessions into the river. The Queen realized their most valuable possession was her son, and in order to save the tribe she needed to sacrifice him to the river.

Continue Reading →

Operation Crossroads

Operation Crossroads | A series of nuclear weapon tests conducted by the United States in July 1946.

Yoruba People and Scarification

With a population close to 40 million, the Yoruba People are one of the largest tribal ethnic groups of West Africa, found predominantly in Nigeria. One distinguishing feature of the Yoruba are their tribal markings, also known as tribal beautification or scarification marks. This practice is considered an ancient art and cultural activity for the Yoruba.

Due to the sheer number of individuals within the Yoruba, these tribal markings became a way and means of identifying the origin of an individual, their lineage, and which community or sub-tribe they belonged to within the Kingdom of the Yoruba.

Tribal marks were also originally made on young children in an attempt to protect them from slave trading. It was the absence of these markings, which made them vulnerable to being captured. For those tribe members who were sold into slavery, these markings allowed the Yoruba people to identify and recognize one another.

Sacred text describes the history of tribal marks. It is believed King Sango, who reigned during the Oyo Empire, sent two slaves to a distant country on an important mission. In due course they returned and the King found that one slave had successfully achieved what he had been sent to do, while the other had accomplished nothing. The king therefore rewarded the first with high honors and commanded the second to receive a hundred and twenty two cuts all over his body. This was considered a severe punishment, although when the scars healed they gave the slave a rather remarkable aesthetic appearance which took the fancy of the King’s wives.

Sango decided that in the future, cuts should not be given as punishment but rather as a sign of royalty, at once placing himself in the hands of the markers. However, the king could only stand the first two cuts, so from that day onwards two cuts on the arm have been the sign of royalty. Various other markings came to identify different tribes.

It’s the little things that count.

Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined.
- Henry David Thoreau

Sometimes when everything looks dark, you find a small sign of hope that keeps you going.